Everything You Know About the Feat
The Historian
by Elizabeth Kostova
I liked this book, although it had some flaws. If nothing else, though, it was enjoyable and it was very long, and so that's good. I hate changing books every three hundred pages or so. If a story's worth writing, surely it can stand a little more time to tell? Mark that bit about "worth writing", though, Robert Jordan.

That's not really fair, as Jordan's story probably was worth writing, but he managed to pad out a nice three- or four-book series into twelve nine-hundred-page novels. That isn't necessary.

Also, Kostova is a much better writer. Then again, so am I. So is Wh, although she usually has less to say and also doesn't speak English.

This strays from the point, however. I like The Historian for it's locales, and it's love of old books. I liked the characters, too. I didn't like the central conceit, however: that the story was reconstructed from old letters and diary entries. I admire the homage to Stoker (Kostova's novel is also about Dracula) but I felt that it didn't work... she tries to have it both ways. Each chapter quotes heavily from a letter, but the action has been "fleshed out" by the narrator... so which is it? Are we reading "historical" documents, or a narrative? Both, apparently, and it didn't work for me.

Also, I completely failed to understand the twist epilogue.

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